Why Barbie, a Blimp and a Wienermobile Are Posting on Airbnb


It was a heat August night in Evanston, Ill., simply north of Chicago, when the Wienermobile rolled out the purple carpet for a sleepover.

Actually, the carpet was inexperienced, and not a lot carpet as synthetic turf. Inside the Wienermobile, the meat model Oscar Mayer’s signature advertising machine, there was a pullout mattress and a mini fridge. There had been sizzling canine sun shades, sizzling canine onesies and precise sizzling canines with all of the accouterments. (But no ketchup: Chicago doesn’t actually do sizzling canines with ketchup. It’s a factor.)

It was the primary time a Wienermobile had been repurposed for paid lodging, the results of a collaboration between Oscar Mayer and Airbnb, the home-sharing platform that has more and more tried to woo prospects by promising journey in addition to lodging.

If the Wienermobile stunt sounds acquainted, it might be as a result of Airbnb has entered into related collaborations since then. The Goodyear blimp welcomed Airbnb company final month. A life-size model of Barbie’s Malibu Dreamhouse opened its doorways final week. And Downton Abbey — that’s, Highclere Castle in Hampshire, England — will take two lodgers this month.

All of these presents had been a part of a advertising marketing campaign at Airbnb, and all of them made information headlines. That was no accident.

“I think a lot of brands, in the future, they need to be in the business of making news, not just advertising,” stated Brian Chesky, Airbnb’s chief govt. “And to make news you have to do something that is worth somebody reporting about.”

The first of these collaborations was with Oscar Mayer, a model owned by Kraft Heinz. Bonnie Rosenberg, 32, a Chicago resident, stayed within the Wienermobile on Aug. 1, its first evening as a lodge. She knew the entire thing was a advertising ploy for Oscar Mayer and Airbnb. But all of it appeared so campy, nostalgic and enjoyable.

“I noticed an article on Twitter from The Chicago Tribune covering it, and I was like, jackpot,” she said. “I definitely want to do this.”

Ms. Rosenberg said she and her husband, Bill Welense, 36, had a good time leaning into the absurdity of it all. “It was really surreal, I have to say, because it was set up like a movie set would be,” she added.

The Wienermobile and similar lodging opportunities were available on a first-come-first-served basis, and only for a few nights. So while millions of people read about them, not many were able to book them.

That scarcity can be effective for companies seeking news coverage, according to Ron Berman, an assistant professor of marketing at the Wharton School. “It needs to be more of an interesting story — let’s call it an aspirational experience — than an actual experience,” he said.

While getting the right kind of attention is difficult, news reports that link brands with interesting opportunities can make for excellent marketing, Professor Berman said. And New York Times reporters who write about those marketing tactics could be helping the brands even more.

But Airbnb, which has been valued at about $30 billion, is worth watching as it expands beyond lodging and into the more nebulous realm of experiences. The platform has already asserted itself as a disruptive force in the hotel and real estate industries — clashing with cities, neighborhoods and residents in pitched legal battles at almost every step of the way. And last week, after a shooting at a rental property that killed five people at a Halloween party, Mr. Chesky said on Twitter that Airbnb planned to crack down on “party houses.”

In Malibu, Calif., the Barbie mansion didn’t really exist as such until Mattel teamed up with Airbnb to promote the Barbie brand’s 60th anniversary. Adorned with pops of pink specifically for last week’s booking, the property was open to four people for just two nights. Still, it earned news media coverage from CNBC, The New York Post and Fox News.

“We felt that this partnership with Airbnb would be a really fun and relevant way” to reinforce Barbie’s place in popular culture, said Lisa McKnight, the global head of Barbie and dolls for Mattel.



Source link Nytimes.com

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