How to Share a Screen With a Teenager: Your TV Questions Answered


I’m a single father. What can I watch with my teenage daughter that’s advanced sufficient to maintain her curiosity however gained’t have us each cringing at overt intercourse scenes? We’ve outgrown “Doctor Who” and received uninterested in “Gilmore Girls.” We each preferred “Lady Bird” individually however wouldn’t have felt comfy watching it collectively. We liked “Pushing Daisies,” “Poldark,” “Call the Midwife,” “The Crown,” and “Everwood.” “Monty Python’s the Life of Brian” and “Monty Python and the Holy Grail” went on her top-five listing, as did “Anna and the Apocalypse.” We like quirky, advanced and candy. — Zane

Comedy-wise, your subsequent strikes are “Futurama” and “The Good Place.” They are certainly quirky, advanced and candy! It appears like she likes a mixture of intellectual and lowbrow, and “Futurama” particularly scratches that actual itch. “The Good Place” is extra earnest, nevertheless it’s not above sight-gags and comical vats of chili.

“Futurama” is a cartoon set 1,000 years sooner or later, during which our doofy protagonist, Fry, has been unfrozen. It’s created by Matt Groening, so it has a related sensibility to “The Simpsons,” nevertheless it’s a office comedy, not a household one. “The Good Place” is about within the afterlife, so although it’s live-action, it usually has a cartoony vibe.

For dramas, I believe you’ll like “The Fosters,” one of many higher teen exhibits of the previous decade. It has the fantastic schmaltz of “Everwood” — let’s cry at each episode! — however with a firmer dramatic grounding. It’s much less pat, and it’s extra upfront with its traumas. The present follows Callie, a teenager newly out of juvie who will get positioned with a foster household, conveniently named the Fosters. The moms, Stef and Lena, are already dad and mom to Stef’s organic son, Brandon, and the adopted twins Jesus and Mariana, and so they wind up welcoming Callie and her brother Jude into the fold. While the present is extraordinarily heartwarming, it’s additionally not afraid of robust subjects: intercourse abuse, habit, violence, injustice. It appears like your daughter is mature — I imply, she preferred “The Crown” — however simply F.Y.I.

My two favourite exhibits are “30 Rock” and Seasons 1-Three of “Arrested Development.” I want some related half-hour episodes as I drift off to sleep. Any ideas? — Dan

I want a new consolation present after the second go-round of “The Office.” I watched “Parks and Rec” a whereas again however — nah. Tried “Brooklyn 99,” not working. “Russian Doll” — nah. My previous tried and true is “Frasier,” however I might actually use some assist to keep inside with the air-conditioner! — Toni

You ought to each watch “Schitt’s Creek.” It has the exasperated rants and intelligent one-liners of “30 Rock,” the out-of-touch matriarch of “Arrested Development,” the ensemble chemistry of “The Office,” the occasional farce of “Frasier,” and above all, it’s joyful and foolish and simple to love. I believe the primary season is a little shout-y, although your mileage could differ; be at liberty to begin with Season 2. (It’s all on Netflix, and Season 6 returns to Pop subsequent 12 months.)

Help me! I can’t stop watching “Parks and Recreation.” I love it so much but my children are so over it they don’t even want to be in the house with me anymore. “Parks and Recreation” is my macaroni and cheese. Leslie is my rocky road ice cream. It just feels so good. Any suggestions? — Amie

I’m not just saying this because you included foodstuffs in your letter, I swear: You should watch a few of the web series from Bon Appétit, namely Gourmet Makes,” in which Claire Saffitz tries to make fancy versions of junk food; It’s Alive with Brad,” in which Brad Leone teaches viewers fermenting techniques and sometimes travels; and any of the “[Person] Makes [Recipe]” videos that don’t seem to have a collective title, in which, you guessed it, people make recipes. (My favorite is “Chris Makes Lobster Rolls,” which I’ve watched no fewer than 10 times.) The videos are deeply informative, but they’re even more entertaining, and because they’re edited to include lots of what would otherwise be outtakes, they have a sort of mockumentary energy. It’s like the show and the making-of-the-show in one. There’s ample goofiness, real sincerity, differing skill sets — and meaningful affection, admiration, and frustration among all the chefs. It’s an ensemble comedy!


Are you looking for your next great TV love? (Or reckoning with your latest show divorce?) Send in your questions to watching@nytimes.com. Questions are edited for length and clarity.



Source link Nytimes.com

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *